Is Your Form On Point?

Our bodies are made to move. But to maximize athletic performance, it's important to use proper form and technique. Using the right biomechanics can also help you avoid aches, pains and injury.

Here are a few tips from Bellin Health Titletown Sports Medicine and Orthopedics Clinic's Movement Performance Lab for improving your form and technique:

Hip Stability
Hip stability refers to the alignment of the hip-knee-ankle. In the before picture you can see the knee collapses inside the line of ankle to hip. When the knee falls inside this line it is referred to as knee valgus. Ideal movement patterns have the knee either directly on the ankle to hip line or slightly outside the line, as seen in the after picture.


                       
Pelvic Stability
Pelvic stability refers to the ability to hold your pelvis level during single leg activities. In the before picture you can see the left side of the pelvis drops. This puts a tremendous amount of stress on the right hip and knee. In the after picture you can see the athlete is able to keep the pelvis level and knee in a good position. Pelvic instability is common in runners.


    
Trunk Stability

Trunk stability refers to your ability to stabilize your trunk in the front view (frontal plane). In the before picture you can see that the athlete is unable to control her trunk from leaning to the left which causes her to rotate on her leg and put her knee in a bad position. In the after picture you can see her trunk is neutral and her knee is in a better position.


  
Shock Absorption

Shock absorption refers to your ability to absorb the impact of single or double leg ballistic movements. This occurs during running and jumping. In the before picture the athlete is upright and does not get a lot of depth while landing. In the after picture you can see the athlete gets her hips back with good depth. The combination of a soft landing and good depth decreases stress to the joints and increases stress to the muscles.


  
Hip Strategy
Hip strategy refers to a movement technique that increases the load to the hip joint and decreases the load to the knee joint. In the before picture you can see the athlete is upright with the knee protruding over the toes. In the after picture the athlete is sitting the hips back, trunk forward, and knee behind the toes. In this position more of the load is put to the hips and less to the knees.

Bellin Health Titletown Sports Medicine and Orthopedics Clinic's Movement Performance Lab can determine what might cause an increased risk of injury or limit a patient's ability to perform at the highest level. We combine the most advanced technology, highly trained staff and integrated functional space to help our patients achieve their maximum potential on the playing field.

To learn more or to make an appointment, call 920-430-4888 or make an appointment online.